Plays: 1,132,009

asktheundeadroyals:

15 seconds of all the songs I could find that sync with this gif

x

frozenmusings:

I needs me some Baby Sven on my blog.

ging-ler:

hannahberrie:

Awkward Screencaps 1/? - All Hail the Queen

Some people are worth melting for.

sorryblondie:

the evolution of Kristoff looking at Anna (▰˘◡˘▰)

philliptunalunatique:

nightshadehoney:

thederpyhipster:


"Arendelle is indebted to you, Your Highness.”

Let’s take a look at Hans’ smile here as this woman says this to him. This here was the moment that sold me on Hans being a benevolent prince. He leans down, looks this woman in the eye, and smiles despite the terrible state Arendelle is in.
That smile is genuine.
For the first time in his life, Hans has responsibilities over a kingdom. He has the chance to show people that he’s more than willing and more than able to be a ruler. He’s grateful for this opportunity, and he seizes every moment he is given as he looks over Arendelle. He wants to do well.
This is why Hans shouldn’t be dismissed as just a “douchebag” or just plain “evil.” This smile shows just how happy he is to be fulfilling his dream.
Hans is far more complex than these simple labels people have given him.

Yes! Look at this cutie giving out coats! I was spoiled for the villain reveal before I saw the movie, so during this part all I could think was “b-but he can’t be all bad…he’s giving out coats.”
I think Hans wanted the throne, not for power, but for respect and admiration; it’s like a replacement for the familial love he never got.
Han is like a twisted version of a classic fairytale hero archetype. The underdog youngest brother who has to rely on his own cleverness instead of his inheritance  in order to get ahead is a fairly common theme in European folklore, probably because of how common male primogeniture (eldest son gets basically everything, younger brothers are on their own) was in Europe. Twelve or thirteen brothers shows up often too (; It’s one of those Disney “follow your dream~” stories that the audience never gets to see. Hans just wanted to find his place and go the distance; he just doesn’t care who he had to step on to get there.

would hans be considered as a byronic hero then?

philliptunalunatique:

nightshadehoney:

thederpyhipster:

"Arendelle is indebted to you, Your Highness.”

Let’s take a look at Hans’ smile here as this woman says this to him. This here was the moment that sold me on Hans being a benevolent prince. He leans down, looks this woman in the eye, and smiles despite the terrible state Arendelle is in.

That smile is genuine.

For the first time in his life, Hans has responsibilities over a kingdom. He has the chance to show people that he’s more than willing and more than able to be a ruler. He’s grateful for this opportunity, and he seizes every moment he is given as he looks over Arendelle. He wants to do well.

This is why Hans shouldn’t be dismissed as just a “douchebag” or just plain “evil.” This smile shows just how happy he is to be fulfilling his dream.

Hans is far more complex than these simple labels people have given him.

Yes! Look at this cutie giving out coats! I was spoiled for the villain reveal before I saw the movie, so during this part all I could think was “b-but he can’t be all bad…he’s giving out coats.”

I think Hans wanted the throne, not for power, but for respect and admiration; it’s like a replacement for the familial love he never got.

Han is like a twisted version of a classic fairytale hero archetype. The underdog youngest brother who has to rely on his own cleverness instead of his inheritance  in order to get ahead is a fairly common theme in European folklore, probably because of how common male primogeniture (eldest son gets basically everything, younger brothers are on their own) was in Europe. Twelve or thirteen brothers shows up often too (; It’s one of those Disney “follow your dream~” stories that the audience never gets to see. Hans just wanted to find his place and go the distance; he just doesn’t care who he had to step on to get there.

would hans be considered as a byronic hero then?